Monday, June 28, 2010

Guest Dandy: My Father's Watch

This is the second in a series of posts from guest blogger, Will Eagle.

When my father passed away a few years ago, my Mother gave me his watches. He'd worked in construction his entire life and rarely wore a watch as it posed a potential hazard should it get caught on some machinery and he didn’t have much of a need for a watch for any formal occasions, so what watches he did have were mostly practical and chosen purely for function. However, amongst his watches I discovered a beautiful vintage Felca, a Swiss company that later became Titoni, a watch that I had never seen him wear. It had a metal strap from another watch that didn't do the face justice, but the mechanism was self-winding and kept excellent time. I decided to change the strap to something more Dandy inspired, reinventing an old piece into something new.


A chap named Brian at the watch repair shop I went to offered up a very helpful suggestion; when choosing a strap for a watch, look for color cues on the face. He said that often there is something on the face that gives a hint as to what a complimentary strap color could be. In this case, if you look very closely at the ends of the hands you'll see a touch of yellowish orange, prompting me to choose the leather strap that I now wear. It could easily be the faceplate itself, the numbers or any other accent. Spurred by this small success, I've had fun changing the straps on most of my watch faces, creating what feels like all new watches for a price significantly cheaper than a new or newly purchased vintage one altogether. Here are some more examples of other changes I’ve made:



A square Armani watch I bought when I moved to Canada from the UK that had a brown leather strap, and while I loved it, it felt too small to be a man’s watch. Switching the strap to a military style green canvas completely changed the look of the watch and after 6 years of never wearing it, I now wear it more than once per week.



A gold colored Brook’s Brothers watch that has multiple strap options for fun and easily changeable preppy options.




For a long time, this vintage Bulova had a brown leather strap with orange stitching, which gave it a casual look that I loved, but adding the strap left over from the Armani watch made it feel more elegant, and it soon started to get a lot more wear.



I was in Ottawa this weekend and met a chap named Francesco Corsaro, who had a beautiful vintage Lucerna with an updated modern strap.

If you’ve inherited a watch but it doesn’t quite match your style or you are looking for a change for one you already own, investigate strap options to reinvigorate your timepiece. Have you successfully reinvented any of your watches? Post a link to your photo in the comments.

Will Eagle is a British Dandy residing in Toronto and his dream watch would be a vintage Longines. You can follow him on Twitter @willeagle.
Tweet This

4 comments:

Michael Carper said...

How easy is it to remove and replace a leather band?

Will Eagle said...

@Michael

Surprisingly easy. I don't have the proper tools, but, I find a pair of nail scissors works. Just use your fingers to move back a little bit of the leather strap to reveal the spring pins inside that hold it in place - you just need to get enough of a grip on the pin to slide it down so it pops out of the hole (use the scissors to do so.) Then you can take off the strap, and add in a new one, popping the spring back in. One tip though - remove the springs in a small enclosed area, I've lost springs by losing my grip and having them fly off into the room - they're tricky to find on the floor!

Ray Frensham said...

I think I'll taje the gold square Brooks Brothers wtch, thank you very much (will pay for the postage to the UK). Do you accept paypal?

Charles Henry said...

Actually Michael, the jewelry shop or watch repair shop where you get your replacement band will usually do it for you.

Ha Ray! I'm sure any of those watches would do very well in complimenting your, shall we say, extensive collection.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...